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February 18th 2009

    While the word aedicule has a structural meaning - something more or less precise - it is in its origin a relative of 'aedes', Latin for 'building', which I suggest is a less precise word.

    In their comprehension of life, the celebrants of the Winter Solstice Competition, will use the word 'aedicule' to refer to a space within a space within a space.  They do so in opposition to that understanding of life that sees life as a 'journey'.  For celebrants of the Winter Solstice Competition, life is not a 'journey' it is a space within a space within a space, or an aedicule. 

    Then there are those in whose comprehension there is a river tumbling toward the sea and in this river we are overwhelmed, but generally cared for, by an understanding greater than our own.

    For celebrants of the Winter Solstice Competition the aedicule is more like a sphere, than it is a series of boxes. 

    The older I get the more I lean toward the aedicule.  Journeys and rivers have too much of the mole to them.  A sort of tunneling blindness in combination with a sneakiness that makes for aggravating personalities.     

 

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(moles) (moles) (worm grunting) (Dawkins)