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Sunday October 13th 2019Tim Candler9

 

     Not sure whether Bo Peep was a good or bad shepherd. Maybe shepherds lose their Sheep all the time, maybe it's just the less experienced shepherd who panics quickly when the odd Sheep goes missing, unaware that sooner or later they return to the fold dragging their tails behind them. A lot of disagreement around who Bo Peep might have been, and probably the truer understandings revolve around Victorian Nurseries rather than some long convoluted account that starts with Medieval Ale Conners who were charged with checking the quality of ale served by publicans, who being devious would employ youths to let them know when an Ale Conner was in the vicinity. These lookouts were called Bo Beeps. And I guess those who gave consideration to framing the occasional nursery rhyme thought Bo Peep kind of a neat name for a little girl shepherd, images of whom never suggest she was possessed of the Paleolithic character little boys tend towards. But best not to get too involved in the debate, let the passion pass into the distance, so that the mind might concentrate on one of Walter Scott's longer poems called Marmion, where the immortal words "Oh what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive" were penned.  In the poem, Marmion was a lord, up there amongst the landed gentleman in the years prior to the Battle of Flodden, when a disagreement between English and Scottish interests met to settle a dispute. The year of the battle was 1513, and Scott's poem was published around 1808. Not sure how to describe any of Walter Scott's poems, but they're kind of ripping yarns if you don't take yourself too seriously, inclined to sneer at the "Sound of Music" but very much liked the musical South Pacific. "I'm going to wash that man right out of my hair, and send him on his way." And that haunting song by Lieutenant Gable "You've go to be carefully taught."

Past

      Lord Marmion had a desire to increase his land holdings by seducing a very wealthy heiress called Clara de Clare. Oddly Lord Marmion plotted with his mistress Constance de Beverly to ruin the reputation of Clara de Clare's fiancée and the love of her life, a man called Sir Ralph de Wilton. You might wonder why Constance de Beverly, Marmion's mistress, would wish to assist Marmion. Well Constance was a nun who had slightly gone off the rails and she thought that by assisting Marmion she would get back into Marmion's good favor. Then while attempting to defend his honor against Marmion's wholly made up accusations Sir Ralph de Wilton challenged Marmion to a duel, which in those days (1500's) was how gentlemen proved their honesty in the court of public opinion. Sir Ralph de Wilton lost the duel and he was so ashamed he went into exile. Clara de Clare was heart broken, she decided to become a nun rather than risk having to deal with Marmion's odious character flaws and equally odious seduction techniques. Nor did it work out for Constance, she was tried, found guilty of being a bad nun and she was walled up, literally she was built into a wall of a nunnery. But in her trail she had managed to gain a few possibilities in the afterlife by giving her panel of judges documents that would prove Sir Ralph de Wilton was innocent of Lord Marmion's outrageous and totally made up accusations. And lo, with documentation of his innocence Sir Ralph was accepted back into the community of gentlemen where he was able to do his bit at the Battle of Flodden during which he was acclaimed a hero, his lands were returned to him and he was able to marry Clara de Clare who'd not yet gone full blown nun. And in that same battle Lord Marmion was killed, happenstance that King James IV of Scotland was also killed. As The World Turns (which lasted 54 years, he's 73 if you need reminding) webs of deceit become tangled but never, ever a shortage of plot twists.    

 

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